Learn about previous faculty events at the Centre for Community Partnerships.

Contents

2016-2017 Events Past events for Faculty 2016-2017
2015-2016 Events Past events for faculty 2015-2016
2014-2015 Events Past events for faculty 2014-2015
Past Workshops Past Workshops for faculty

Past events for Faculty 2016-2017

Knowledge Mobilization Workshop

Friday, November 11, 2016  2 - 4 p.m.  
Main Activity Hall, 2nd Floor, Koffler House, 569 Spadina Ave, University of Toronto

This interactive workshop will be facilitated by Caroline Duvieusart-Déry, Knowledge Mobilization Coordinator, and Lindsey Thomson, Community Engaged Learning Manager, both with the Community Engaged Scholarship Institute at the University of Guelph. Caroline works with faculty members, students and community organizations to facilitate community-university partnerships and enhance the impact of research. Lindsey supports faculty members in building partnerships and curriculum for community-engaged learning.

In this workshop, Caroline and Lindsey will share strategies on how faculty can translate and disseminate knowledge that emerges from community-engaged learning courses. They will discuss various KMb tools and techniques that facilitate the implementation of evidence into practice and support target audiences in sustainable change. The workshop will be generative and will also introduce participants to the Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization, a new professional program offered at the University of Guelph as of January, 2017.

Faculty Course Design Workshop

Tuesday February 28, 2017 1 - 3 p.m.
Meeting Room KP 310, Koffler House, 569 Spadina Ave., University of Toronto  

Join us for a morning workshop that will cover the fundamentals of service-learning pedagogy and practice and provide practical strategies for designing and running a community-engaged learning course. Bring a syllabus that you’d like to re-design or the idea for a course you’d like to create, and together we’ll work on designing a successful community-engaged learning course.

Faculty Roundtable: Reciprocal and Respectful Partnerships with Indigenous Community Organizations

Friday, March 24, 2017  11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

MultiPurpose Room, 2nd Floor, Koffler House, 569 Spadina Ave., University of Toronto               

Roundtable speakers: Jill Carter (Aboriginal Studies and First Story), Marilyn Johnson (Centre for Community Partnerships), Steve Teekens (Na-Ma-Res Native Men’s Residence).

The Centre for Community Partnerships' Roundtables on Community-Engaged Learning aim to foster new ideas, thoughtful conversations and resource sharing among instructors. Join us at our next roundtable to discuss the creation and nurturing of reciprocal and respectful partnerships with Indigenous community organizations in community-engaged learning courses.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s recommendations have importantly stressed the value of an expanded and deepened education for settler and Indigenous students on Indigenous histories, cultures and issues and have led to a rise in interest in community-engaged learning partnerships with Indigenous communities and organizations. How can we, as instructors of community-engaged learning courses, approach our courses and community partnerships so that we that contribute to the resources of Indigenous community organizations rather than tax them? How might we avoid imposing a “burden of help,” and, more significantly, move our students beyond an understanding of community-engaged learning as an exercise of “helping” towards goals of learning, solidarity and activism? 

 

Beyond the University: Innovations in Community-Engaged Learning

June 7, 2017   Institute Keynote Speaker: Alison Isenberg

Why Trenton, New Jersey in April 1968?  Confronting Death and Life in a Great American City.

Co-presented with the Jackman Humanities Institute

Alison Isenberg
Professor of History and Co-Director, Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism and the Humanities, Princeton University

June 8, 2017  Moderated conversation panel and concurrent panels

  • Moderated Conversation: Beyond the Campus: Community-Engaged Learning in the City
  • Concurrent panel 1a: Beyond 'Publish or Perish': Reciprocity in Community Engaged-Research
  • Concurrent panel 1b: Beyond the Text: Community-Engaged Learning in the Humanities
  • Concurrent Panel 2a: Beyond the Reflection Journal: Innovations in Community-Engaged Learning Assessment
  • Concurrent Panel 2bBeyond Service-Learning: Alternative Models of Community-Engaged Learning
  • Roundtable: Beyond Work: The Value(s) of Community-Engaged Learning

Past events for faculty 2015-2016

Faculty gatherings are informal meetings that bring together instructors who teach, or are interested in teaching, community-engaged and service-learning courses. Join us for this opportunity to learn from your colleagues and share strategies and resources.

Community-Engaged Learning Course Design Workshop 

Friday October 9, 2015

The fundamentals of service-learning pedagogy and practice and practical strategies for designing and running a community-engaged learning course. 

Community-Engaged Learning Faculty Roundtable: Innovation

Friday November 6, 2015

Roundtable speakers: Ahmed Allahwala (City Studies), Alistair Dias (Human Biology), Siobhan O’Flynn, (Canadian Studies, University College), Linzi Manicom (New College) and Jenna Sunkenberg (St. Michael's College)

Community-Engaged Learning Reading Group

January 26, 2016

The Fundamentals of Community-Engaged Learning

February 8, 2016

An introduction to the pedagogy and practice of service-learning, and a discussion of the merits and challenges of integrating community engagement into an academic course as a way to support course objectives and learning outcomes.

Community-Engaged Learning Faculty Roundtable: Dissemination
Thursday March 3, 2016​

Roundtable speakers: Michelle Arnot (Pharmacology and Toxicology), Christine Berkowitz (History), Shauna Brail (Urban Studies), Charles Levkoe (Geography and Planning), Reid Locklin (Study of Religion and St. Michael's College) and Franco Taverna (Human Biology)

 

Thriving as Community-Engaged Scholars:  Reciprocity, Integrity and Rigour

May 25, 2016   

The 2016 Faculty Institute on Community-Engaged Learning focussed on the theme of "Thriving as Community-Engaged Scholars: Reciprocity, Integrity and Rigour." Through this theme we explored what it means to work with integrity as a scholar in community partnerships. We also discussed how we build rigour into our community-engaged teaching, writing, and research partnerships. The day also included a lunch, panels on community-engaged scholars and workshops. 

Prof. Sherril Gelmon from Portland State University gave the keynote titled, "Creating a Rich and Vibrant Academic Career through Community-Engaged Scholarship." Prof. Gelmon is a Founding Chair of the International Association for Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement and is a past recipient of the Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award from Campus Compact. She is Canadian and an alumna of the University of Toronto where she also held teaching positions.

Other speakers included:

  • Shauna Brail, Presidential Advisor on Urban Engagement, Bill Ju, U of T Allison Chris, Roxanne Wright, all from U of T 
  • Eileen Antone, Professor Emeritus, U of T
  • Nadine Sookermany, George Brown College and Springtide Resources
  • Lisa Chambers, Director of Centre for Community Partnerships, and Kristina Minnella, Centre for Community Partnerships

Past events for faculty 2014-2015

Faculty gatherings are informal meetings that bring together instructors who teach, or are interested in teaching, community-engaged and service-learning courses. Join us for this opportunity to learn from your colleagues and share strategies and resources.

 

Working with Community Partners in a Service-Learning Course

October 7, 2014

Speakers:

Susanna Bunce (Department of Human Geography)

Alex Dow (Malvern Family Resource Centre)

Reid Locklin (Department for the Study of Religion and St. Michaels College)

 

Reading Group: Community-Engaged Learning

October 21, 2014

Reading: "Service-Learning and Critical Emotion Studies: On the Perils of Empathy and the Politics of Compassion" (Lisa Langstraat and Melody Bowdon, 2011)

 

Publishing Scholarship on your Community-Engaged Teaching

November 11, 2014

Speakers:

Michelle Arnot (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

Shauna Brail (Urban Studies Program, Innis College) Cora McCloy (Centre for Teaching Support and Innovation) 

 

Service-Learning in STEM Fields

February 12, 2015

Speakers:

Franco Taverna (Human Biology, New College)

Cindy Bongard (Centre for Teaching and Learning, UTSC)

Paola Hidalgo (Astronomy and Astrophysics)

 

End-of-Year Reflection & Discussion

April 16, 2015

Past Workshops for faculty

Samples of faculty workshops hosted by CCP in the past

What’s The Point? Clarifying, Refining and Aligning Reflection Assignments with Service-Learning Goals

Academic service learning has developed theoretically in the past decades in ways that invite us to articulate the learning goals of students’ service learning experiences more clearly and to refine assignments accordingly.  In this workshop, Linzi Manicom (Community Engaged Learning Program, New College) will lead us briefly through current theoretical paradigms to trace out their implications for how we might think about our pedagogy, the learners, and more specifically, the objectives of our reflection assignments.

In the second part of the session, there will be an opportunity to develop your own course assignments, incorporating ideas from the discussion that you have found useful, and then to showcase your assignments for constructive feedback from your peers. Please be prepared to bring course syllabi and assignments to the sessions if you are already teaching a service-learning course. If you have not yet taught a service-learning course, please come with your preliminary ideas.

 

The Fundamentals of Academic Service-Learning

This session will provide an introduction to the pedagogy and practice of service-learning and a discussion of the merits and challenges of integrating community engagement into an academic course as a way to support course objectives and learning outcomes. During this session, we will cover the fundamental components of service-learning, current examples of University of Toronto service-learning courses and the use of critical reflection assignments to connect students’ community engagement with course content. There will also be an opportunity for you to reflect on how service-learning pedagogy might support your teaching and learning goals and to meet other instructors interested in integrating community engagement into their courses.

Co-hosted by the Centre for Community Partnerships, the Experiential Education Office in the Office of the Dean, UTM and the Robert Gillespie Academic Skills Centre

 

Faculty Professional Growth: Reflecting on Pedagogy and Practice

In this workshop, Barbara Harrison (University of Guelph) will present recent research on the importance of your own reflective practice in informing your service-learning courses, provide some tools for pedagogical reflection and create a space to undertake some reflection on your courses and your roles as educators.

 

The Fundamentals of Academic Service-Learning

This session will provide an introduction to the pedagogy and practice of service-learning and a discussion of the merits and challenges of integrating community engagement into an academic course as a way to support course objectives and learning outcomes. During this session, we will cover the fundamental components of service-learning, current examples of University of Toronto service-learning courses and the use of critical reflection assignments to connect students’ community engagement with course content. There will also be an opportunity for you to reflect on how service-learning pedagogy might support your teaching and learning goals and to meet other instructors interested in integrating community engagement into their courses