Procedures and timelines for your course enrolment varies by faculty. Typically, exchange students are not able to enroll in courses in the same way that degree-seeking U of T students can. Therefore, it is important to pay attention to the instructions given to you by the CIE or your faculty contact. 

Once you have been accepted as an exchange student at the University of Toronto, your faculty will send course selection information to the institutional email address you provided in the online application form. This email is usually sent out by the end of June or early July for all admitted students coming for the fall and/or winter terms.

Contents

Prepare to be flexible We cannot guarantee enrollment in any course.
Calendars and timetables Course calendars provide descriptions of all courses within the faculty/department.
How to read a course code A course code tells you which department is offering the course, the level of the course, the credit value of the course and the campus where the course is offered.
Enrollment controls Enrollment controls indicate if the course has been restricted to certain students by the department.
Meeting the pre-requisites Pre-requisite courses are courses you need to complete (or have an equivalent of) before enrolling in a course.
Required course load Exchange students must be enrolled in a number of courses equivalent to a “full-time” student within the faculty.

Prepare to be flexible

While we do our best to keep you informed of any exchange student course restrictions, we cannot guarantee enrollment in any course. It is important to maintain an expectation of flexibility in your course load. Reasons for not being able to enrol in your chosen course can include any of the following:

  • The course is not offered during the term that you will be at the University of Toronto
  • The department deemed that you have not taken the prerequisite courses or do not have the necessary academic background
  • The course is full
  • The department has reserved spots for degree-seeking students

For more details on restricted courses, please visit our Academic Options & Restrictions page.

Calendars and timetables

Course calendars provide descriptions of all courses within the faculty/department. Course timetables provide the day of the week, time, location, and instructor for courses. Not all courses are offered every year. Calendars and timetables are updated on an annual basis by the faculties and are usually available between March and May for the upcoming academic year.

How to read a course code

A course code tells you which department is offering the course, the level of the course, the credit value of the course and the campus where the course is offered. Course codes typically include the following:

  • 3 letters denoting the department or college sponsoring the course
  • 3 numbers denoting the level (graduate courses are typically 4 numbers)
    • Undergraduate: 100, 200, 300, 400
    • Graduate: 1000, 2000, 3000, etc.
    • The higher the level, the more difficult the course
    • 100 level courses are typically introductory level courses and are often taken by first year students; 400 level courses are often only taken by undergraduate students in their final year of study
  • 1 letter indicating the credit or full-course equivalent (FCE) value (H = 0.5 credit, Y = 1.0 credit)
  • 1 number indicating the campus (1 = St. George campus; 3 = UTSC campus; 5 = UTM campus)

The timetable will indicate the term and meeting time of the course, as well as details about who can and cannot enroll for that course (enrollment controls):

Term

  • F = First session
  • S = Second session
  • Y = First and second sessions

For example, ANT100Y1-Y is a 100-level course taught by the Department of Anthropology, with a credit value of 1.0, taught at the St. George campus. It takes place during the first and second terms.

Meeting Section

  • LEC or L = lecture
  • PRA or P = practical
  • TUT or T = tutorial

All courses have a Lecture (L) meeting section. If there is more than one L section listed, select the one that is offered at the time most convenient for your schedule. If a course listing also includes P and T meeting sections, you must select these in addition to an L section. Meeting sections that begin with the number 5 (e.g., L5101) begin at 5 p.m. or later.

Additional information about the course, including the duration or number of hours included in the course, can be found in the course calendar.

Enrollment controls

Enrollment controls indicate if the course has been restricted to certain students by the department. For a complete explanation of the various letters (P, R, PE, RE, etc.), visit the Codes Used in the Timetable Listings webpage. Restricted courses may not be available to exchange students.

Meeting the pre-requisites

Pre-requisite courses are courses you need to complete (or have an equivalent of) before enrolling in a course. Please make sure you have taken the necessary pre-requisite courses at your home institution (or in the first term at U of T) when choosing your U of T courses. If you do not have the pre-requisite courses, you might not be approved to take that course.

Required course load

Exchange students must be enrolled in a number of courses equivalent to a “full-time” student within the faculty. This number varies by faculty. Additionally, your home institution may provide guidance on the number of courses you should take while at U of T, based on how credits will transfer upon your return.

Arts & Science students on the St. George campus must be enrolled in a minimum of 3 (1.5 credits) and maximum of 5 (2.5 credits) per term.

Daniel's Faculty of Architecture students and Applied Science & Engineering students must be enrolled in a minimum of 4 (2.0 credits) and maximum of 5 (2.5 credits) per term.